August 14, 2014
“Actual DH (however you choose to define it) isn’t the Humanities with digital pixie dust sprinkled on it. It’s hard, often unglamorous, sometimes mechanical work that has a lot in common with the unglamorous sides of traditional humanities work, like working your way painstakingly through archives to find historical evidence, or digging in the dirt for fragments left behind by civilizations past. To be sure, there are high-level insights and interpretation that should come out of this work (and cool visualizations), but there are no reliable shortcuts, because there aren’t really any rules.”

Rules | Duke Collaboratory for Classics Computing (DC3)

May 20, 2014
“In short, the humanities do not have any particular political, moral, or life-enriching tendency “baked in.” What are they good for, then? I don’t think this is particularly hard to answer. The humanities are good for contextualizing and interpreting texts and other text-like human artifacts, particularly artifacts that are regarded as especially authoritative or masterful and that belong to an identifiable intellectual or artistic tradition.”

What are the humanities good for? | An und für sich

May 03, 2014

The pieces collected here, under our “Publishing the Archive” heading, all tug from one direction or another on the notion that the distinction between building and organizing a digital archive, on the one hand, and publishing interpretive or argumentative work based on its contents, on the other, is growing increasingly blurred. From digitization to databases to linked data and APIs for extensive machine-readability, the new-form organizing and distribution of archival content is coming more and more to resemble research and publication. Hence the archiving work described in this issue; to a degree, all of it makes a scholarly argument through its formal structure, its interface, and its metadata. A digital archive is effectively an analog archive’s apotheosis. Once archived materials are digitized, possibilities for orchestrating access to them and building thematic (and even argument-making) connections with other materials increases exponentially. In structuring the archive, writing its metadata, and designing its interface, the digital archivist is making an argument about the meaning and cultural context of the archive’s contents.

May 03, 2014

The interviews were semi-structured. Questions were prepared with two main aims: firstly to uncover the womens’ memories of working on the project and secondly to uncover their memories of working with Busa himself. What emerged was a number of insights into the social, cultural and organisational conditions that they worked under and how they, as women, were treated in what was a male-dominated environment.

March 08, 2014
ausfeminist:

The radical history of International Women’s Day
International Women’s Day has become mainstream in recent years. But historically it was a socialist event. Clara Zetkin, a leading member of the German Social Democratic Party (SDP) in the early 1900s, argued that the working class would never win its battles without women and raised the issue of special party work among women. Under her leadership, a working women’s movement grew rapidly in Germany, and the female membership of the SPD rose from 10,500 in 1907 to 150,000 in 1913. …

ausfeminist:

The radical history of International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day has become mainstream in recent years. But historically it was a socialist event. Clara Zetkin, a leading member of the German Social Democratic Party (SDP) in the early 1900s, argued that the working class would never win its battles without women and raised the issue of special party work among women. Under her leadership, a working women’s movement grew rapidly in Germany, and the female membership of the SPD rose from 10,500 in 1907 to 150,000 in 1913. …

(Source: insufficientmind)

March 07, 2014
thedopedupphoenix:

WOMEN IN HISTORY: Hattie Elizabeth Alexander (1901–1968)
Hattie Alexander developed the first effective remedies for Haemophilus influenzae, reducing the mortality rate from nearly 100 percent to less than 25 percent. Alexander was also among the first scientists to identify and study antibiotic resistance, which she correctly concluded was caused by random genetic mutations in DNA.  In 1964, she became the first woman elected president of the American Pediatric Society.

thedopedupphoenix:

WOMEN IN HISTORY: Hattie Elizabeth Alexander (1901–1968)

Hattie Alexander developed the first effective remedies for Haemophilus influenzae, reducing the mortality rate from nearly 100 percent to less than 25 percent. Alexander was also among the first scientists to identify and study antibiotic resistance, which she correctly concluded was caused by random genetic mutations in DNA.  In 1964, she became the first woman elected president of the American Pediatric Society.

(Source: xdopedupphoenix)